UNDER PRESSURE

January 12, 2017  •  2 Comments

A frosty morning by the River Stour at Flatford, Suffolk  © Justin Minns/National Trust

When the weather forecasters talk of snow on the hills, it's not something that really affects those of us living in East Anglia. We don't have hills here. Well, we do but when the rest of the countryside is barely above sea level it doesn't take an awful lot to earn the description. It's a shame because it means that we don't usually get the snow that us landscape photographers crave or even much of a winter at all. Its got to the point where a touch of frost is something to get excited about here.

Ironically the images I get asked for most often are winter scenes. I have a wish list of places to photograph looking suitable white and chilly for magazines, greetings cards, calendars, commissions and other projects. So, with the weather forecast predicting a slight chance of the odd flake of snow hitting the region, it seemed a fitting time to write this blog, which has been whirling around in my head for a while.

At the moment photography is still my second job so I have limited time at my disposal, especially in the winter when days are short thus when a rare spell of wintry weather graces us with it's presence I find myself looking at the daunting length of my list and wondering where on earth to start. This was the case towards the end of last year when a couple of beautifully crisp, frosty mornings presented me with a great opportunity to start working on 'the list'.

After poring over weather forecasts, I decided to go to Flatford, an area I am currently photographing for the National Trust. With the trees along the banks of the River Stour twinkling with a sugary coating of frost and a layer of mist hanging over the crisp meadows, conditions were perfect and I couldn't believe my luck. I should have been enjoying being out in such beautiful countryside but instead, knowing that I wouldn't get many opportunities like this I found myself feeling the weight of the pressure to make the most of the conditions and as a result, rushing to get as many shots as possible. There's nothing wrong with working quickly but unless you want a memory card full of average shots rushing isn't the way to go. To spend so much time waiting for perfect weather conditions only to go to pieces when they arrive is incredibly frustrating especially as I should know better. 

So why, when the temperature drops, do I start feeling the heat?  

The problem is that I like to work slowly, to explore the possibilities on offer at a location, taking several shots of each scene and fine tuning the composition until I'm happy with the image, before moving on. With an imaginary clock ticking it's hard to focus on (mentally rather than optically) and immerse yourself in the task at hand. Strangely when it comes to writing, I'm completely the opposite. I need an impending deadline to prod me into action... why do you think this blog gets updated so infrequently? I need the pressure to get the thing finished to spur me into actually starting but that unfortunately, doesn't work for me when it comes to photography.

I'm not complaining, being paid to take photos of the East Anglian countryside is a dream job and I love (almost) every minute of it. It just comes at a price. Gone are the days of bumbling along taking photos of of whatever takes my fancy, now I have to be more disciplined and go wherever the job takes me and go there with a plan and a shot list to make the most of my time. I guess this is what it is to be a professional photographer.

I usually try and end my ramblings with some sort of conclusion but I have to admit I'm not sure what it is here, I'm just venting. I either need to learn to work more efficiently, find more time for photography or move to Canada. Of course it's possible that I build this pressure up in my head and I'm just being hard on myself. Photographers are always striving for perfection and I rarely return from a shoot without thinking of ways I could have done better but given a few days to let the dust settle I usually find I've got a few 'keepers' and things aren't as bad as they first seemed.

Now, where did I put my snow shoes?

> Flatford visitor information


Comments

2.Steve Rickman(non-registered)
Hi Justin, I must say I really do appreciate your work and enjoy viewing it. To be honest it came as a complete surprise to me to learn you had not already turned professional. However that is just another step away, and certainly the quality of your work would not preclude you from this for sure. I think it is a hard decision to make. Many years ago I became self employed professional in a different field and it was not the work I found difficult but as you say the pressure it brings upon you, and there were many. Not just working to deadlines but the thought that i was the bread winner, so I had dare not fail. Some of the pressure was without doubt self inflicted.
As for the pressures of photography I feel the same, time is always at a premium and rushing instead of working methodically brings forward those schoolboy errors all to often, I have memory cards full of them! I need to slow back down, its not a race, well only against the light. It is sad that we are not blessed much with snow in the south, so I guess we must make the most of small mercy's.
Enjoyed reading your blog.
Best of Luck with shrugging off the pressure
1.Tony(non-registered)
Love that picture :-)
No comments posted.
Loading...

Justin Minns is a part time photographer whose award winning landscapes have been widely published.

 

 

Keep up to date on flickr,
facebook or twitter.

 
 

Subscribe
RSS
Archive